Vinyl Flooring

Pros and Cons of Vinyl Plank Flooring
Today’s flooring alternatives are so diverse that the average consumer is easily perplexed by the “alphabet soup” (remember our waterproof flooring blog?) of acronym product names in just one flooring type, let alone the numerous possibilities in each category. Sometimes it helps to narrow the focus a little. Reduce the number of options. So, shall we do that?
Let’s discuss about Vinyl, specifically vinyl plank flooring. Vinyl plank flooring is gaining popularity for both home and commercial uses. But what are all of these acronyms? LVP? WPC? WTH? We’ll discuss LVP, SPC, and WPC, as well as their differences and pros and downsides.
When we say “vinyl flooring,” many people immediately think of Mom’s sheet/roll flooring in their childhood kitchen or the stick down tiles from college – you know, the ones you ripped a hole in when you dropped something on them while making nachos to watch the big game?! If you’re thinking that, think again.
The parallels between today’s outstanding vinyl items and those of the past are minimal: they’re both synthetic, man-made variants designed to seem like natural materials at a cheaper price range.
However, today’s vinyl flooring is a highly constructed, resilient product that goes by the acronyms LVP (occasionally LVT), WPC, and SPC. But what’s the difference? I’m glad you asked. This article will help you grasp the differences between them, but keep in mind that your professional colleagues at The Good Guys are well-versed in all of this and are available to answer any questions or concerns.
LVP
LVP stands for Luxury Vinyl Plank. LVP covers all vinyl planks, giving the appearance of wood flooring while retaining all of the benefits of vinyl. You may occasionally hear the word “LVT,” which stands for Luxury Vinyl Tile. LVT refers to all vinyl goods that are made to resemble tile or stone. In general, however, LVP is the more widely recognized and used acronym. For the purposes of this article, we’ll use “LVP” as a catch-all word, as it is in the flooring industry.
All LVP is vinyl plank, however not all vinyl plank is LVP. Are you confused yet? Let’s dig a little deeper into LVP.
LVP is a composite product made up of multiple layers that work together to create a durable, low-maintenance flooring. The bottom layer is a “backer board” – a flexible PVC base for stability. Most LVP is “water-resistant” rather than “waterproof” since the middle core layer is typically not totally waterproof, but it does add strength to the flooring. On top of the core is a “vinyl layer” printed with a design and color that traditionally resembles wood or stone. On top of it all is the most important layer: the wear layer.
The wear layer is a thin, clear protective coating that keeps the flooring scratch and stain-free. The thickness of the wear layer often dictates the usage: thinner planks are utilized for residential floors, while thicker planks are used for commercial floors. Wear layer thickness ranges from 6 mil on the thin end to 30 mil on the high end. Standard commercial wear layers range in thickness from 12 mil to 20 mil; those under 12 mil are recommended for light business and household use.
LVP is a more flexible product than some other vinyl goods on the market, but its robustness is assisted by the fact that it is glue-down flooring, which means it is firmly connected to the subfloor using adhesive. These planks do not interlock or float, unlike their Rigid Core counterparts.
RIGID CORE WPC/SPC.
Rigid Core Vinyl Plank is one of the most popular and fastest growing vinyl plank flooring products on the market today. Rigid cores might be WPC (Wood-Plastic Composite) or SPC (Stone-Polymer Core). While most commonly constructed to resemble real hardwood flooring, the initial letter — “W” or “S” — denotes the composition of the core layer alone.
Rigid Core WPC/SPC flooring, like LVP, is made up of layers, which when combined provide a flooring suitable for residential, commercial, wet, and dry spaces. The foundation layer is a connected foam or cork underlayment that provides underfoot comfort as well as some sound absorption. On top of it is the core, which is what gives these Rigid Core flooring solutions their name, and is made of a wood or stone powder mix with plastic or resin. The vinyl layer sits immediately above the core, utilizing digital technology to add color and print excellence to your home. The wear layer adds scuff and scratch resistance to the flooring.
Unlike traditional LVP, WPC and SPC flooring are waterproof and can be installed in wet areas of both residential and commercial buildings. The wood in the core will not bend, buckle, or expand if it comes into touch with water in typical everyday use.
WPC and SPC vinyl are float-installed, which means they are not “permanently” attached to the substrate. No adhesive is required! These flooring planks link using interlock systems such as tongue-and-groove, allowing the floor to “float” above the subfloor beneath it. It comes in a variety of thicknesses (5, 5.5, 6.5, and 8 mm, usually) for lighter to more robust applications, as well as a similar lighter or more robust impact on your wallet. In comparison, SPC vinyl flooring is often thinner, and the density of the stone-based core allows for a significantly tougher plank with a smaller profile (3.2 to 7mm vs. 5 to 8mm). In any case, consult with your friends at The Good Guys to determine the best solution for your property. Thicker planks feel better underfoot and are stronger, so they do not flex as much under traffic. While all subfloors may require some level of floor preparation before installation, WPC or SPC flooring’s thicker stiffness makes it an excellent choice for uneven subfloors!
This popular new flooring option is available in a wide range of colors and finishes to create the ideal look for the room.
WHAT IS GOOD AND WHAT IS NOT?
So we’ve gone over these fantastic vinyl plank flooring alternatives, and they’re all wonderful. This is the end of the post. We’re finished. Aight. Imma Prepare to leave. Not so fast.
True, these are excellent choices, but nobody, and no flooring, is flawless. Let’s take a look at the “pros” and “cons” of various vinyl floor varieties. You’ll see some recurrent motifs. See if you can find them!
LVP Pros:
It’s cheap! (Okay, relatively speaking)
LVP is a cost-effective option to create a great impact in your room; it’s substantially cheaper than traditional hardwood and may deliver a comparable look and incredible durability for your budget.
It Has That Style.
LVP has nearly endless options for looks replicating other materials like wood and stone, and it can add splashes of color or patterns/grains to match any decor.
It’s versatile to a point!
LVP is more water resistant than even laminate floors. So, it can be positioned in high traffic areas where you don’t have to worry about spills or pet accidents right away.
It’s Tuff Enuff!
LVP is durable (remember those wear layers?). Scuff, dent, and scratch resistant, and can withstand the traffic of active homes.
But nothing is perfect. Let’s look at the disadvantages of LVP.
LVP Cons:
Installation Sometimes stinks.
While your flooring contractor at The Good Guys will make this simple for you, LVP installation typically requires adhesive. And attaching the flooring to the subfloor can take some time and produce an odor while it dries. It may make future replacements more difficult because the glue may become resistant to remove over time. However, when compared to WPC or SPC flooring, replacing a single broken slat of LVP is simple. Because these planks are not interlocking, they may be easily removed and replaced. With WPC or SPC flooring, you would have to back the floor out to the damaged area, repair the damaged plank, and then reinstall the rest of the flooring.
Does sunshine on your floor make you happy?
Some less costly LVPs have thinner wear layers that provide poor UV resistance. If your room receives a lot of natural light, uncovered areas may fade over time. Looking to rearrange your furniture? If you have faded patches, your guests will recognize where the chaise lounge and shag rug used to be. Again, your Good Guys professional will assist you with this, but it is something to consider if your home benefits from a lot of natural light.
Luxury, Do You Have It? To be clear, LVP is not and will never be hardwood. That is not a terrible thing, but many purchasers see it as such, so if you intend to sell your home, vinyl plank will not yield the same profit as solid hardwood. LVP cannot be refinished, although many hardwood floors can.
WPC/SPC Pros:
As they’re similar items, let’s compare the two “PC” possibilities in terms of benefits and cons:
Starting Cost:
WPC/SPC, like LVP, is a cost-effective, albeit more expensive, solution to attain that desired look with durability on a budget.
The Look
WPC/SPC vinyl flooring comes in a seemingly unlimited variety of colors, patterns, and textures. Providing the appearance of other materials such as wood and stone and adding splashes of color or patterns to match a range of designs from traditional to contemporary.
Easy to install
Let’s face it: working with The Good Guys’ flooring professionals makes installation a snap. However, when compared to other flooring options, WPC/SPC flooring installs far more smoothly and may be adapted to your specific space. In some cases, it can be put over existing flooring!
It’s versatile!
WPC/SPC, unlike laminate, can be put in moist places because they are waterproof. Let me repeat that: feel free to put it in both the kitchen and the mudroom. The bathroom is in the basement. The sky is the limit! Or, perhaps the ground is the limit?
It’s Tuff Enuff!
WPC/SPC is frequently more durable than LVP. It is scuff, dent, and scratch resistant, and can withstand the traffic of a busy family. And sure, this was simply an excuse to utilize Tuff E’Nuff again.
But nothing is perfect. Let’s look at the disadvantages of WPC/SPC.
WPC/SPC Cons:
Sunshine Go Away Today.
Check the UV resistance, just as you would with LVP, if you have a bright space.
It’s not wood, Babe.
Let’s get real: WPC and SPC, like LVP, are not and will never be hardwood. It cannot be refinished and is not suitable for everyone, particularly if you intend to sell the home.

Vinyl Flooring